Estás navegando por el archivo de marcas.

International Business Law (International Trade Degree-ULE). Lesson 4 (1,2,3,4). Notes for non jurists.

el 3 octubre, 2018 en Derecho de los Negocios Internacionales International Business Law. Grado Comercio Internacional, DM2- Derecho de la Competencia, propiedad industrial e intelectual. Grado en Derecho

Intellectual Property Law. International Business Law (IBL) International Trade Degree (Bachelor). Schedule and materials for Lesson 4.

 

WIPO, 2017

 

 

 

Lesson 4. International Business Law (International Trade Degree-ULE). Lesson 4 (1). Notes for non jurists. Introduction

el 3 agosto, 2018 en Otros

Lesson 4. International Business Law (International Trade Degree-ULE). Lesson 4 (1). Notes for non jurists. Introduction.

In this topic we address the legal regime  of varied  types of intangible goods, and rights that have them as their object: Industrial and Intellectual Property Rights that protect certain creations of the human mind: inventions, literary works, and symbols, etc.

  • Such rights are the object of national recognition and protection, although they are  frequently exploited and exchanged internationally.
  • The exchange and traffic of  intangible goods and rights  has increased with the new technologies.
  • IP  Rights are exceptions to the freedom of the market, since they recognize areas of “monopoly”.
  • They are regulated:
    • At national level: as they are territorial rights, for example in the Spanish Trademark Law, The Spanish Patent Law.
    • At international level: The international regulation of these rights has contributed to the approximation or even unification of the content of these rights.
    • At european level: EU legislation has helped in harminizing their contents. Also, it has created new rights of specific EU scope
Common Principles (IPR-IP)
  • Territoriality. – These rights are territorial in nature. Their protection is limited to the territory, or territories of the State or States where they are recognized or granted.
    o Example: There are as many copyrights, or as many industrial property rights, as States recognize them. This rule is qualified when there are International Treaties.
  • Independence.-  Each State is free to establish the protection regime it deems most appropriate, regardless of the protection recognized by other States.
    o Example: each State may have different requirements and content for copyright. This rule is qualified when there are International Treaties.
  • Limited temporal duration. Industrial and Intellectual Property Rights (IPR-PI) are recognized for a limited time, after which they become part of the “public domain”.
Basis for international protection. Common Aspects (IPR-PI)

A The classical system: a mix of National Laws and International Treaties 

  • The rule protection of Industrial and Intellectual Property Goods and Rights  is a direct consequence of territoriality. National legislations grant protection with general character (in Spain the Art 10.4 Civil Code) and also by means of specific laws such as Patent Law, Trademark Law, Copyrights Law.
  • Traditional International Private Law,  “conflict” criteria are used to determine the law applicable to the protection of IPR-PI (and to determine tthe competent Court to judge over them  when there is a cross border element). Such “conflict criteria” are found in National Legislation and also in some International Treaties.  .
  • International and European Treaties and Norms also  regulate this matter.
  • Some International Treaties to determine the law applicable (“conflict regulations in International Treaties”). It is generally accepted that at the international level, the most appropriate protection “conflict”  criterion is the application of the law of the country for which protection  is sought (lex loci protectionis): a right can only be protected where it is recognized. This principle is recognized, for example, at the global level for contractual and non-contractual (copyright) relations by the Berne Convention of 1886 (The Berne Convention contains “conflict rules” and some “material rues” as well. Also (in Europe) for non-contractual relations by Commission Regulation 846/2007, known as the Rome II Regulation which is a “conflict Regulation” and states that “The law applicable to a non-contractual obligation arising out of an infringement of an intellectual property right shall be the law of the country for whose territory protection is claimed”. In accordance with the those Treaties and Regulation, the lex loci protectionis governs:  the creation of the right, the content of the right, its extinction, its duration, the conditions for protection, ownership, transfer, rights over them, etc.; as well as the conditions that must be met for the right to be considered infringed.
  • Other Traties establish “substantive/material rules of protection”. They are  International  harmonizing  International Treaties
    • Examples:
      • Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property of 20th May 1883 (referring to Patents and Trademarks). It is said that the signatory states to this Convention make up the “Paris Union”. The rules of the Paris Convention provide for some harmonization in the levels of protection of Member Countries, and  for legal certainty for right holders. Among its Principles we find:
        • Principle of National Treatment: the Contracting States must grant the nationals of the other member countries of the Convention the same protection as their own nationals (Art. 2).
        • Right of priority.   On the basis of the regular filing of an application for protection of an industrial property right in one of the member countries, the same applicant or his successor in title may for a specified period (6 months for trademarks and 12 months for patents) apply for protection for the same subject matter in all other member countries. These applications enjoy a right of priority over other rights in the same trademark or invention filed after the date of the first application, and priority over subsequent acts (in order to seek a declaration of invalidity, for example, in the event of the sale or licensing of these rights)
        • Independence, qualified by “registration of trademarks as they are” (Art. 6, Paris Convention), the obtaining and maintenance of a trademark in a territory does not depend on the application, registration or renewal of the same trademark in its country of origin (such sentence reflects the principle of independence). However, Art. 6.5 of the same text allows the protection of the mark “as is” which allows the owner to register in all States the same distinctive sign in its formal aspect that is registered in its country of origin, without more. This protects owners and consumers by reducing the differences in the use of a trademark on the international market.
        • Protection of well-known marks. Article 6bis of the Paris Convention obliges member countries to refuse or cancel the registration and to prohibit the use of a mark capable of creating confusion with another well-known mark in that member country. Notoriety is protected, even if not registered, to avoid unfair advantage.
          • PLEASE NOTE THAT:  Following the conclusion of the ADPIC/ TRIPS Agreement (Extended GATT/Uruguay Round), the provisions of the Paris Treaty are integrated into the enlarged GATT and the number of countries to which the principles of the “Paris Union” apply is increased.
        • Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, 1886. Last revised in Paris in 1971. It deals with Intellectual Property (Copyright). Among its Principles we can find:  Lex loci protectionis (as a conflict rule), but also  it contains harmonizing and/or unifying norms such as the Principle of National Treatment,  and minimum contents of the copyrights
        • Rome Convention for the Protection of Performers, Producers of  and Broadcasting Organizations of 1961. It deals with Intellectual Property (neigbouring rights). It establishes: Lex loci protectionis (as a conflict rule), but also  it contains harmonizing and/or unifying norms such as the Principle of National Treatment,  and minimum contents of the the neighbouring rights within its scope.
  • A third group of International Treaties have a procedural nature, and their relevance lies in the fact that they centralize the registration of rights.  Their objective is to facilitate the possibility of registering a right in several countries simultaneously.
    • i. 1970 Washington Patent Cooperation Treaty
    • ii. Madrid Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Marks. 1891
    • iii. The Hague Agreement Concerning the International Deposit of Industrial Designs of 1925 last revised at Geneva in 1999 Hague Agreement Concerning the International Deposit of Industrial Designs of 1925 Last Revised at Geneva in 1999
    • iv. (At the level of Europe – but outside the EU): Munich Convention of 1973 which centralises the granting of patents at the European level since with the filing of a single application as many national patents can be obtained as European countries have been designated in the same application. EPO
    • v. Unitary patent System. UE, except Spain

B) Specialities of the TRIPS/ADPIC Agreement (and some subsequent Treaties)
Industrial and Intellectual property rights were the focus of attention in the GATT Uruguay Round, thus concluding the TRIPS Agreement (ADPIC in Spanish). Its addressees are the Member States of the WTO. It has a mechanism for conflict resolution and allows for  sanctions for States that fail to comply with this TRIPS Agreement.

  • TRIPS incorporates provisions of other Treaties  and also some new ones. It compels signatories States to assume the main material rules of the Paris Conventions for the protection of industrial property and Bern conventions for the protection of literary and artistic works that ar, thus,  applicable to all WTO countries. It extends the minimum rights for example in well-known trademarks (according to Paris Union). Introduces the obligation to protect computer programs and databases through copyright law -art 10-.
  • It introduced provisions for greater IPR-IP protection known as “TRIPS PLUS” in the negotiation of bilateral trade agreements between USA/Europe with less developed countries, in order to advance the international protection of these rights.

In addition, the US and Europe lead a group of states that concluded in 2010 the ACTA Treaty (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) on combating counterfeiting and piracy for further strengthening IPRs. Its compatibility with Fundamental Rights and Personal Data has been criticized and questioned.

C) Specialized international organizations***

  • INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ORGANIZATION . WIPO is a specialized agency of the United Nations which administers the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works of 1886 and the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property of 1883. It also administers the Rome Convention (jointly with ILO and UNESCO) on the Protection of Performers, Producers of Phonograms and Broadcasting Organizations (1961).
  • WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION. The WTO was established in 1995. It is based in Geneva. Its official languages are English, French and Spanish. It is not part of the United Nations system.
  • EUROPEAN PATENT OFFICE. The EPO, based in Munich, was created by the Munich Convention of 1973. It manages the European Patent and currently the Unified Patent.
  • EUIPO The Office for Harmonisation in the Internal Market, created in 1994, it  is a specialised body of the EU. It manages the EU Trade Mark and EU Design. Its headquaters are based in Alicante (Spain).

D)  Specialities of European law (EU)

  • Unification of certain rights, through the creation of new independent figures. The EU, in order to overcome the principle of territoriality and its negative effect on Community freedoms, it has opted (where possible) to create EU IP Titles, ie: European Trade Mark, European Design. Specific arrangements are made for a Unified Patent System (Spain does not participate in the Unified EU Patent System).
  • Harmonisation. By means of Industrial Property Directives (particularly trademarks and intellectual property).

Also to note is the Principle of “Community exhaustion” (agotamiento comunitario). This is a way of preventing the principle of territoriality from hindering the free movement of goods. The ECJ has long developed the doctrine of so-called “Community exhaustion” whereby the holder of an industrial or intellectual property right cannot be allowed to oppose the importation of products lawfully marketed in another Member State by the holder or with his consent. The judgments of the ECJ Deutsche Grammophon (C-78/70 of 1974); Centrafarm (C-15/74 of 1974); Silhouette (C-355/96 of 1998) and Davidoff (C-414/99 of 2001) stand out in this field. This case law  principle has been enshrined in national legislations.

 

 

Back to Schedule

La marca mixta «France.com» no puede registrarse como marca de la UE por el riesgo de confusión con la marca mixta «France»

el 31 julio, 2018 en Derecho de los Negocios Internacionales International Business Law. Grado Comercio Internacional, DM2- Derecho de la Competencia, propiedad industrial e intelectual. Grado en Derecho, Otros

Así lo ha decidido el Tribunal General de la Unión Europea en su sentencia de 26 de junio de 2018, dictada en el asunto T-71/17, France.com, Inc./EUIPO.

Fotografía tomada de la Sentencia.

D. Jean-Noël Frydman solicitó en 2014 a la Oficina de Propiedad Intelectual de la Unión Europea (EUIPO), el registro como marca de la Unión para servicios publicitarios, servicios vinculados a viajes y publicaciones en línea del siguiente signo figurativo:

Posteriormente el Sr. J.-N. Frydman cedió sus derechos a la empresa estadounidense France.com.

Francia formuló oposición invocando, que ya había registrado ante la EUIPO en 2010 la siguiente marca de la Unión:

Fotografía tomada de la Sentencia.

La EUIPO estimó la oposición de Francia, al entender que los signos en conflicto presentaban un grado elevado de semejanza a nivel global y se aplicaban a servicios idénticos o similares, por lo que no podía descartarse un riesgo de confusión entre ambas marcas.

Frente a la resolución de la EUIPO, la empresa France.com solicita ante el Tribunal General de la Unión Europea su anulación.

Pues bien, precisamente la sentencia a la que nos referimos aquí, dictada por el Tribunal General, desestima el recurso de la empresa France.com, confirmando que el signo de dicha empresa no puede registrarse como marca de la Unión.

A este respecto, el Tribunal General verifica el análisis acometido por la EUIPO en torno a la comparación de los signos enfrentados y la existencia de riesgo de confusión, teniendo en cuenta el art. 8.1.b del Reglamento 207/2009.  Respecto a la comparación gráfica de los signos,  el Tribunal General estima, a diferencia del pronunciamiento de la EUIPO, que, dadas las diferencias existentes entre sus componentes y su configuración visual general, la semejanza a nivel gráfico de los signos enfrentados, globalmente considerados, es escasa. Ahora bien, en el plano fonético el Tribunal General confirma la conclusión alcanzada por la EUIPO, que no es otra que la siguiente: los signos en conflicto son casi idénticos, ya que cabe suponer que muchos consumidores se referirán al signo de la empresa France.com simplemente como «france», ya que la abreviatura «.com» se percibe como indicación de una página web. Finalmente, el Tribunal General señala, al igual que lo hiciera la EUIPO, que los signos en pugna son semejantes conceptualmente, transmitiendo ambos un mismo concepto (Francia, la Torre Eiffel y los colores de la bandera francesa), siendo irrelevante el componente denominativo «.com» del signo de la empresa France.com, al carecer de incidencia sobre la identidad conceptual de los signos.

Por todo ello, parte el Tribunal de que los signos en cuestión, enfrentados, distinguen servicios idénticos o similares y  presentan un grado especialmente elevado de semejanza a nivel fonético y conceptual. Y, por ello, concluye -con buen criterio- que existe riesgo de confusión. Así las cosas, a partir de este razonamiento, el Tribunal, estima, al igual que lo hiciera la EUIPO, que Francia puede oponerse válidamente al registro del signo “france.com.”

Es sabido que contra esta resolución del Tribunal General puede interponerse recurso de casación ante el Tribunal de Justicia, limitado a las cuestiones de Derecho, en plazo de dos meses desde la notificación de la resolución.

El comunicado de prensa de prensa nº 91/18 del Tribunal, en el que dá cuenta de la referida Sentencia puede verse aquí , y el  texto íntegro de la Sentencia  aquí.

 

Una marca constituida por un color aplicado en la suela de un zapato no está comprendida en la prohibición de registro de las formas prevista en la Directiva 2008/95/CE.

el 21 junio, 2018 en Derecho de los Negocios Internacionales International Business Law. Grado Comercio Internacional, DM2- Derecho de la Competencia, propiedad industrial e intelectual. Grado en Derecho, Otros

 

Fotografía tomada del texto de la Sentencia del Tribunal de Justicia.

Así se ha pronunciado la Sentencia del Tribunal de Justicia (Gran Sala) de 12 de junio de 2018 en el asunto C-163/16 Christian Louboutin y Christian Louboutin SAS / Van Haren Schoenen BV. Esta Sentencia  trae causa en la petición de decisión prejudicial que tiene por objeto la interpretación del artículo 3, apartado 1, letra e), inciso iii), de la Directiva 2008/95/CE del Parlamento Europeo y del Consejo, de 22 de octubre de 2008, relativa a la aproximación de las legislaciones de los Estados miembros en materia de marcas.

Se trata de una cuestión de gran interés en el ámbito de las marcas, más concretamente, en el tema de la delimitación precisa de los signos hábiles para constituir una marca y, de manera especial, en este tipo de marcas tan ligadas al mundo de las formas estéticas relevantes en el mundo de la moda, protegibles como marca.

A fin de encuadrar la cuestión, situémonos en los antececentes de hecho:

  • El Sr. Louboutin y Christian Louboutin SAS diseñan zapatos para mujer de tacón alto conocidos por la particularidad de lucir una suela revestida de rojo. En 2010, el Sr. Louboutin registró su marca en el Benelux, en la clase denominada «zapatos», que sustituyó en 2013 por la clase «zapatos de tacón alto». A tenor de la descripción de la marca, consiste en «el color rojo (Pantone 18-1663TP) aplicado en la suela de un zapato.

Precisamente, en la solicitud de registro, la marca se describe según se indica a continuación: «La marca consiste en el color rojo (Pantone 18‑1663TP) aplicado en la suela de un zapato tal como se muestra en la imagen (el contorno del zapato no forma parte de la marca, su única finalidad es poner de relieve la posición de la marca)».

 

  • La sociedad Van Haren, que explota establecimientos de venta al por menor de calzado en los Países Bajos, vendió durante 2012 zapatos de tacón alto para mujer con la suela revestida precisamente de color rojo. El Sr. Louboutin y su sociedad interpusieron demanda ante los tribunales neerlandeses dirigida a que se declarara que la comercialización de zapatos por Van Haren había vulnerado la marca de la que es titular el Sr. Louboutin.

Van Haren alegó que la marca de Louboutin es nula. Concretamente se apoyaba en que el art. 3, apartado 1, letra e), inciso iii) de la Directiva sobre marcas, recoge entre las causas de nulidad o de denegación de registro, la relativa a los signos constituidos exclusivamente por la forma que dé un valor sustancial al producto.

  • El rechtbank Den Haag (Tribunal de Primera Instancia de La Haya, Países Bajos), al conocer de este caso, decidió plantear una cuestión prejudicial al Tribunal de Justicia. El órgano jurisdiccional remitente reconoce que en otoño de 2012, «en el Benelux una parte considerable de los consumidores de zapatos para mujer de tacón alto podía identificar los zapatos de [Christian Louboutin] y, por tanto, distinguirlos de los zapatos para mujer de tacón alto de otras empresas», por lo que, en esa fecha, la marca controvertida se percibía como una marca de este tipo de producto. Añade este órgano jurisdiccional que, además, la suela de color rojo confiere un valor sustancial a los zapatos comercializados por Christian Louboutin, al formar parte este color de la apariencia de este tipo de calzado, y jugar  un un importante papel a la hora de decidir sobre su compra. A este respecto, el órgano jurisdiccional remitente señala que, en un primer momento, Christian Louboutin utilizó el color rojo de las suelas por razones estéticas y que fue en un momento posterior cuando lo concibió como una identificación de origen y lo utilizó como marca.
  • El rechtbank Den Haag considera que la marca controvertida está indisociablemente vinculada a una suela de zapato, cuestionándose acerca de si, conforme a la Directiva, el concepto de «forma» se limita a las características tridimensionales de un producto, como son el contorno, la dimensión y el volumen, o si además abarca otras características, como el color.

La cuestión prejudicial se formula, textualmente, con este tenor literal:

«¿Se limita el concepto de “forma” en el sentido del artículo 3, apartado 1, letra e), inciso iii), de la [Directiva 2008/95] —en sus versiones alemana, inglesa y francesa, respectivamente, form, shape y forme—a las características tridimensionales del producto, como son el contorno, la dimensión y el volumen (que han de expresarse en tres dimensiones), o también hace referencia a otras características (no tridimensionales) del producto, como el color?»

 

Pues bien, sobre este tema, esta sentencia del Tribunal de Justicia resuelve que, a falta de definición del  concepto de «forma» en la Directiva, procede determinar su significado atendiendo a su sentido habitual en el lenguaje corriente.

– Y ateniéndose a este sentido usual del término, el Tribunal de Justicia estima que un color en sí mismo, sin estar delimitado en el espacio, puede constituir una forma. Según el Tribunal de Justicia, si bien la forma del producto o de una parte del producto desempeña un papel en la delimitación del color en el espacio, no puede considerarse que un signo esté constituido por la forma cuando lo que se pretende al registrar la marca no es proteger dicha forma, sino únicamente la aplicación de un color en un lugar específico del producto.

– Desde esta perspectiva, el Tribunal razona que la marca no está constituida «exclusivamente por la forma» en el sentido de la Directiva sobre marcas. Y ello porque no se trata de que la marca esté constituida por una forma específica de suela de zapatos de tacón alto, tal y como se desprende de la descripción de la marca, en la que se indica expresamente que el contorno del zapato no forma parte de la marca, sino que únicamente sirve para poner de relieve la posición del color rojo objeto del registro.

– El Tribunal de Justicia interpreta que no cabe considerar que un signo, como el controvertido en el presente asunto, esté constituido «exclusivamente» por la forma cuando su objeto principal es un color precisado mediante un código de identificación internacionalmente reconocido.

En suma, el Tribunal de Justicia dilucida la cuestión prejudicial planteada en estos términos:

“El artículo 3, apartado 1, letra e), inciso iii), de la Directiva 2008/95/CE del Parlamento Europeo y del Consejo, de 22 de octubre de 2008, relativa a la aproximación de las legislaciones de los Estados miembros en materia de marcas, debe interpretarse en el sentido de que un signo consistente en un color aplicado a la suela de un zapato de tacón alto, como el controvertido en el litigio principal, no está constituido exclusivamente por la «forma», en el sentido de esta disposición.

El texto íntegro de la sentencia puede verse aquí.

Comentarios desde el Gid, Mayo 2018. Messi puede registrar su marca «MESSI» para artículos y prendas de vestir deportivos, pese a la existencia de las marcas anteriores «MASSI» de una sociedad española

el 29 mayo, 2018 en DM2- Derecho de la Competencia, propiedad industrial e intelectual. Grado en Derecho, Otros

 

Comentarios desde el GID

Mayo 2018

Tribunal General. Fotografía. Fuente: Tribunal de Justicia de la Unión Europea

Tribunal General. Fotografía. Fuente: Tribunal de Justicia de la Unión Europea

MESSI PUEDE REGISTRAR SU MARCA «MESSI» PARA ARTÍCULOS Y PRENDAS DE VESTIR DEPORTIVOS PESE A LA EXISTENCIA DE LAS MARCAS ANTERIORES «MASSI»DE UNA SOCIEDAD ESPAÑOLA

María Angustias Díaz Gómez
Catedrática de Derecho Mercantil
Coordinadora del Grupo de Innovación Docente de Derecho Mercantil de la Universidad de León
(GID-DerMerUle)
 

 

El renombre del jugador de fútbol neutraliza las similitudes gráficas y fonéticas con las marcas anteriores “MASSI”.  Ulterior información en COMENTARIOS GID mayo 2018 pdf
En este sentido se ha pronunciado la Sentencia del Tribunal General de 26 de abril de 2018
Según el Tribunal General Lionel Messi puede registrar su marca «MESSI» para artículos y prendas de vestir deportivos.
Para el Tribunal General el renombre del jugador de fútbol neutraliza las similitudes gráficas y fonéticas entre su marca y la marca preexistente  «MASSI» perteneciente a una sociedad española.
El interés fundamental de la sentencia reside en que para el Tribunal  el riesgo de confusión cede o se disuelve por la vis atractiva del elemento conceptual que arrastra el término «messi», que destruye toda suerte de riesgo de confusión con las marcas anteriores.

 

Lee el resto de la entrada →

Marca de la Unión Europea. Apreciación de riesgo de confusión únicamente en una parte de la Unión.

el 14 noviembre, 2016 en Derecho de los Negocios Internacionales International Business Law. Grado Comercio Internacional, DM2- Derecho de la Competencia, propiedad industrial e intelectual. Grado en Derecho, DM_Publicidad, Otros, Régimen jurídico del mercado. Grado Comercio Internacional

Comentarios desde el GID

Noviembre 2016

informat

Marca de la Unión Europea. Apreciación de riesgo de confusión únicamente en una parte de la Unión. Alcance territorial de la prohibición prevista en el art. 102 del Reglamento (CE) n.º 207/2009

(A propósito de la Sentencia del Tribunal de Justicia [Sala Segunda] de 22 de septiembre de 2016)

Aquí

María Angustias Díaz Gómez

Catedrática de Derecho Mercantil. Coordinadora del Grupo de Innovación Docente de Derecho Mercantil de la Universidad de León (GID-DerMerUle).

 

Resulta interesante esta Sentencia de 22 de septiembre de 2016, dictada en el marco de una petición de decisión prejudicial, que tiene por objeto la interpretación del Reglamento (CE)nº 207/2009, de 26 de febrero de 2009, sobre la marca de la Unión Europea. Y el interés reside en que el Tribunal de Justicia ha tenido ocasión de pronunciarse, de forma clara, sobre el carácter unitario de la marca de la Unión Europea, la apreciación del riesgo de confusión en una parte de la Unión y el alcance territorial de la prohibición prevista en el art. 102 de dicho Reglamento. Dicha claridad, no obstante, no implica que no pueda suscitar problemas prácticos la aplicación de los criterios establecidos en la sentencia, a la hora de determinar si se produce  riesgo de confusión. Leer más

Sistema Internacional de Registro de Marcas. Madrid Monitor

el 3 octubre, 2016 en Derecho de los Negocios Internacionales International Business Law. Grado Comercio Internacional, DM2- Derecho de la Competencia, propiedad industrial e intelectual. Grado en Derecho, Otros

El Sistema de Madrid es un mecanismo centralizado para el registro y la gestión de las marcas en todo el mundo. Con una única solicitud, un idioma y una tasa se puede proteger la marca en hasta 97 miembros, de la OMPI. Se rige por el Arreglo de Madrid, adoptado en 1891, y el Protocolo concerniente a ese Arreglo, adoptado en 1989.

Intellectual Property. Patents, Trademarks. International Business Law. Notes for non jurists

el 26 agosto, 2016 en Derecho de los Negocios Internacionales International Business Law. Grado Comercio Internacional, DM2- Derecho de la Competencia, propiedad industrial e intelectual. Grado en Derecho

Lesson 4 (3). International Business Law. IBL. Intellectual Property. Patents, Trademarks

(As a supplement to classroom notes and other course materials)

UNDER CONSTRUCTION

Patents
  • Definition 
    • A patent is an exclusive right granted for an invention (inventive activity), which is a product or a process that provides, a new product or procedure for doing something (novelty), and offers a new technical solution to a problem (industrial application). To get a patent, technical information about the invention must be disclosed to the public in a patent application.
  • Rights 
    • The patent owner/ right holder has the exclusive right to prevent or stop others from commercially exploiting the patented invention. In other words, patent protection means that the invention cannot be commercially made, used, distributed, imported or sold by others without the patent owner’s consent
    • Patents are territorial rights. In general, the exclusive rights are only applicable in the country or region in which a patent has been filed and granted, in accordance with the law of that country or region
    • The protection is granted for a limited period, generally 20 years from the filing date of the application
  • Searches (Spain) OEPM search engine
  • More EU Patent Law
  • More International Patent Law

Trademark
  • Definition
    • A trademark is a sign capable of distinguishing the goods or services of one enterprise from those of other enterprises. Trademarks are protected by intellectual property rights
  • Rights
    • a trademark registration will confer an exclusive right to the use of the registered trademark. This implies that the trademark can be exclusively used by its owner, or licensed to another party for use in return for payment.
  • Registration
    • At the national/regional level, trademark protection can be obtained by filing an application for registration with the national/regional trademark office and paying the required fees.
    • International registration. At the international level (Trademark Law Treaty 1994) provides for International registration procedures. There are two options: either country by country applications or using the Madrid System., administered by WIPO (See Madrid “Monitor”  simplified registration system)

The national and EU systems are complementary to each other, and work in parallel with each other.

See also, for further details and clarifications, entries about trade marks in Spain

Lesson 4 (2) Intellectual Property. IBL. Notes for non jurists

el 26 agosto, 2016 en Derecho de los Negocios Internacionales International Business Law. Grado Comercio Internacional, DM2- Derecho de la Competencia, propiedad industrial e intelectual. Grado en Derecho

Lesson 4 (2) Intellectual Property.

 UNDER CONSTRUCTION 

 

(Compulsory readings. Supplement to classroom notes and course materials)

I Introduction

Intellectual Property is intangible property resulting from creations. Its owners and holders have specific rights, as established by law. Please note the differences:

  • (Propiedad Industrial) industrial property, ie: patents on inventions, designs and models, protected designations of origin;  new varieties of vegetal, etc
  • (Signs), trademarks, registered trademarks, service brands etc
  • (Propiedad intelectual) copyright and related rights, ie: music, literature, paintings, sculptures.
  • Commercial strategies and other immaterial property rights: trade secrets, know-how, confidentiality agreements, or rapid production.

Gijón, Asturias

Intellectual Property rights (IPRs) allow title holders (inventors, creators, artists, or other rightsholders) – to decide how, when and where their creations are used and/or exploited. Such rights have a negative and a positive manifestation

IP protection varies from one IP right to another. In very general terms we say that:

  • patents  allow the holder to stop third parties from making, using or selling the holder’s invention for a certain period (maximun of . years (20)
  • trademarks  protect the  “hall mark” (signo distintivo) of protected product/service by preventing other business from offering, etc  services/products under the same hallmark
  • copyright / neighbouring rights.
    • moral or paternity contents
    • economic content,
  • Other IP
    • Classroom notes
  • Please note: licence / cesion

Marca de la Unión Europea.Directrices de Oficina de Propiedad Intelectual de la Unión Europea (EUIPO)

el 12 agosto, 2016 en Derecho de los Negocios Internacionales International Business Law. Grado Comercio Internacional, DM2- Derecho de la Competencia, propiedad industrial e intelectual. Grado en Derecho, Otros, Régimen jurídico del mercado. Grado Comercio Internacional

Con motivo de la entrada en vigor, del Reglamento nº 2015/2424 por el que se modifica el Reglamento sobre la marca comunitaria,el 23 de marzo de 2016  la OAMI ha pasado a denominarse Oficina de Propiedad Intelectual de la Unión Europea (EUIPO) y la marca comunitaria marca de la Unión Europea.

 

Dábamos noticia de la reforma aquí.IMG_20151208_133411396[1]

Un día después de la publicación del mencionado Reglamento (UE) es decir, el 24.03.2016, la EUIPO ha hecho públicas una serie de Directrices que constituyen el punto de referencia principal -explicada- del sistema de marcas de la Unión Europea. Estas Directrices no constituyen textos legislativos, pero fueron objeto de aprobación por parte del Director de la Oficina de Marcas de la UE  el 10.03.2016, y  resultan de utilidad para conocer los principales “escenarios” procedimentales que se desarrollan ante la EUIPO, particularmente a raíz de la reforma. Inicialmente fueron publicadas en español, alemán, inglés, francés e italiano y se esperan próximamente otras versiones lingüísticas.

Estas Directrices afectan a:

Marcas de la UE. Entra en vigor la reforma

el 19 marzo, 2016 en DM2- Derecho de la Competencia, propiedad industrial e intelectual. Grado en Derecho, Otros, Régimen jurídico del mercado. Grado Comercio Internacional

El  24 de Diciembre de 2015 se aprobó el REGLAMENTO (UE) 2015/2424 DEL PARLAMENTO EUROPEO Y DEL CONSEJO de 16 de diciembre de 2015 por el que se establecen normas de ejecución del Reglamento (CE) no 40/94 del Consejo sobre la marca comunitaria, y se deroga el Reglamento (CE) no 2869/95 de la Comisión, relativo a las tasas que se han de abonar a la Oficina de Armonización del Mercado Interior (marcas, diseños y modelos)

El paquete incluye una nueva Directiva de Marcas de la UE donde se incorporan  enmiendas.

Destacamos:

  • La Oficina de Armonización del Mercado Interior (OAMI) pasará a llamarse Oficina de la Propiedad Intelectual de la UE (EUIPO). Ver nota de prensa de OAMI
  •  La “marca comunitaria”, administrada por la OAMI desde 1996, pasará a denominarse “marca de la Unión Europea”. Estos cambios entran en vigor el 23 de marzo de 2016,
  • Las tasas que se abonan a la Oficina también cambian contempándose un nuevo sistema de pago por clase para la solicitud de marca y las tasas de renovación. Una disminución general de las tasas de solicitud y renovación de marcas. Ver la Comunicación del Presidente OAMI (13.02.2016)

Sobre los precedentes inmediatos de esta reforma comentábamos aquí; aquí. También, el archivo Marcas en DerMerUle

La mera utilización de “palabras clave” en los buscadores de Internet no tiene porqué suponer una infracción de marca. Sentencia del Tribunal Supremo

el 4 marzo, 2016 en Ciberseguridad en la empresa. Master U en Ciberseguridad, DM2- Derecho de la Competencia, propiedad industrial e intelectual. Grado en Derecho

La Sala Primera del Tribunal Supremo español acaba de desestimar el recurso de casación interpuesto en relación con alegaciones de infracción de marca por el uso de signo distintivo a modo de palabra clave en un buscador de Internet

El TS concluye que el derecho de exclusiva de la marca no es absoluto en el sentido de que su uso como palabra clave de Internet únicamente será considerado infracción de marca cuando la utilización a modo de “palabra clave” se realice con el fin de identificar un determinado producto o servicio.  Por el contrario, lejos de considerar que existe infracción por el mero hecho de la inclusión de keywords,  será, una vez que el buscador de Internet redirige al usuario al anuncio concreto, cuando haya que examinar los concretos términos de dicho anuncio para poder valorar si se ha infringido -o no- la marca-. El TS se apoya en esta sentencia en la doctrina sentada por el TJUE en el sentido de que, para considerar que estamos ante una infracción de marca, el uso debe perjudicar , o ser susceptible de perjudicar los intereses del titular de la marca en cuestión, directamente relacionados con la función de este signo distitivo. Tales funciones son, como el TJUE ha indicado en más de una ocasión   la de indicar el origen empresarial, la de publicidad y a la de inversión

Nota de prensa del CGPJ. Acceso vía CENDOJ

IMG_20150912_172738333

Sanciona nuestro alto Tribunal que

  • el derecho de uso exclusivo del signo en que consiste la marca no es absoluto.
  • el uso de la marca como palabra clave para buscadores de Internet será considerado infracción de marca ajena cuando se haga a título de tal marca, es decir, con el fin de identificar un determinado producto o servicio.

Además, y en relación  con el uso de marcas registradas como palabras clave en Internet para mostrar enlaces patrocinados señala que es lícito siempre  y cuando:

  1. ese uso no menoscabe ni la función indicadora del origen de la misma, ni su función económica;
  2. resulte claro para un usuario medio de internet que los productos o servicios publicitados no proceden del titular de la marca o de una empresa económicamente vinculada; y de no ser así, se indique bajo qué circunstancia se venden productos de una determinada marca a través de una página web distinta a la “oficial”. La finalidad de este requisito es impedir el riesgo de confusión (ie: asunto Interflora del TJUE)

Post post:  Recomendamos leer el comentario contextualizado y detallado  de esta sentencia, a cargo de la Prof., Aurea Suñol, en el blog Almacén de Derecho.